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Notícies

Dimecres  13.05.2015  00:37

Autor/s: VilaWeb English

Denmark, in favor of seeking a democratic solution for the independence of Catalonia

It is the position held by seven of the eight parties of the Folketing

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The majority of the Danish parliament and its government is in favor of supporting a democratic dialogue between Catalonia and Spain. Seven out of the eight parties that form the chamber have shown their support in finding a solution for the independence of Catalonia. In a 45 minute debate, all of the parties have taken a stance about the Catalan case as a result of the question posed by the left wing Enhedslisten Party (The Red and Green Alliance).

The text that came out of the debate that will be voted for by the majority of the parties, is as follows:

‘The Danish Parliament has paid close attention to the explanation made by the government about the legal, historical, political and international issues connected to the situation in Catalonia and has the opinion that the question of Catalan independence is a case of peaceful and democratic dialogue between Catalonia and the Spanish governments in Madrid.’

The approval of the text through a vote will take place next Tuesday, May the 19th.

Enhedslisten, having 12 seats out of 179, has addressed the following question to the Danish Foreign Affairs Minister, Martin Lidegaard: ‘How will the Danish government support a nation’s right to self-determination, in light of the fact that Catalan society, the Catalan government, as well as an ample majority in the Catalan parliament, want a referendum on independence?’

In his speech, The Foreign Affairs MInister said: ‘ It’s important to find democratic solutions in cases such as the Catalan one.’ He also mentioned to the Spanish constitution and and highlighted: “ It doesn’t recognize other nations in the Spanish state.’. He also has pointed out that ‘ Catalonia lost part of its status in 1714’.

These are the tweets of Diplocat @ThIsCatalonia, who broadcasted the speeches in Danish live:

One of the Enhedslisten deputies, Nikolaj Villumsen, told VilaWeb that he hopes that the message of the Danish parliament will be heard by the Spanish government and the Spanish parliament. Villumsen also said, ‘We are very concerned about the fact that the Spanish government is not engaging in a debate like this.’